Art Podcast

10 Binge-Worthy Art Podcasts in the Age of Coronavirus

We found this awesome resource from The New York Times and wanted to share it here for you to enjoy!

Lee Krasner in the classroom of Hans Hofmann, around 1938, photographer unknown.
Lee Krasner in the classroom of Hans Hofmann, around 1938, photographer unknown.Credit…Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

By Jori Finkel

Many museums and galleries have closed in attempts to slow the spread of the coronavirus, but the conversation about art keeps going — and you can get your fix of the art talk (and also the gossip) through a growing number of art podcasts. Hosts include curators, art writers and artists. Here are my picks for 10 art podcasts worth subscribing to, from one in Los Angeles showcasing the music that moves local artists to another, out of Sydney, focusing on Aboriginal culture.

Recording Artists

Helen Molesworth gives some of the most incisive and insightful exhibition tours of any contemporary art curator of her generation, and her new podcast Recording Artists, produced by the Getty, puts this intellectual-storytelling skill set to good use.

Read more here.

On Talk Art out of London, Russell Tovey, an actor-collector, and Robert Diament, a musician-turned-gallerist, host freewheeling and wide-ranging talks with some big visual artists (think KAWS, Tracey Emin, Grayson Perry) and bold-name creator-collectors (Lena Dunham, Michael Stipe). It’s trendy, gossipy, fast-paced conversational fun, and occasionally frustrating for the tangents left unexplored.

Read more here.

Produced by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), this radio show and podcast focuses on Aboriginal culture, including art, music, theater and film. Mr. Browning, of Bundjalung and Kullilli descent, was trained as a painter himself and it shows, in his strong profiles of contemporary indigenous artists who bridge the gap between traditional and experimental beliefs, processes and materials.

Read more here.

Produced by a division of Sotheby’s called Art Agency Partners and hosted by Charlotte Burns, In Other Words comes closer than other podcasts to the intimacy and insider feeling of being seated at a chic gallery dinner next to a hotshot dealer or curator.

Read more here.

Mosaic of Theodora at Basilica San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy.

In these podcasts, Dr. JaninaRamirez presents herself as an art-object sleuth, “your chief investigator of images,” but she acts more like that memorable college teacher (…). Her academic specialty is medieval culture and several episodes skew that way. She brings on scholars to discuss the stunning Byzantine mosaic of Empress Theodora from the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna, or the reconstruction of the Staffordshire Hoard Helmet — “possibly the single most exciting Anglo-Saxon find of the last 10 years,” she says.

Read more here.

Imagine the ever-popular BBC radio program Desert Island Discs with an artist-only guest list and a feminist bent and you’ll get What Artists Listen To. The London artist Pia Pack started this podcast shortly after moving to Los Angeles in 2017 to explore “the stories and soundtracks of artists’ lives” and get to know female artists in her new community.

Read more here.

Jason Arkles is an American figurative sculptor who settled in Florence because of his work, and his show is a deep dive into the giants of the past who inspire him, from the ancient Greeks through Donatello and Michelangelo to modern legends like Rodin.

Read more here.

The Art Newspaper, a London publication that reports on international art, has created one of the most topical podcasts around. Hosted by Ben Luke, the weekly show is not a digest of recent articles, but a chance to hear experts talk in depth about new developments or trends.

Read more here.

These monthly conversations with international artists, writers and curators come from Momus, the online magazine based in Toronto that bills itself rather self-importantly as a “return to art criticism.” But the podcast, hosted by Sky Goodden and Lauren Wetmore, strikes just the right tone: thoughtful without being academic, analytic and poetic both.

Read more here.

“It looks like the Chrysler Building with a fruit bowl on top,” one museum visitor says. “If I’m correct that it’s a figure, it’s kind of shutdown and shut-in,” another adds. Both are describing Louise Bourgeois’s totemic sculpture “Pillar” (1949-50) and reflect the way that Tamar Avishailikes to start her accessible, personal, but still meaty podcast. She asks museumgoers to describe a particular artwork, then fills listeners in about the artist and the making of the work.

Read more here.

Leave a Comment